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I'm Callie Dauler. Welcome!

I Read This Article And Quit My Job The Week After

I Read This Article And Quit My Job The Week After

There's a really incredible article that was posted in 2012 by a writer named Allison Ford that resurfaces on the internet every few years and in 2016, I happened to stumble upon it and I couldn't say no to the title: "I gave up my dream and I'd do it again". 

Jeff started his new job in early 2016 and he was bouncing out of bed to get to work in the morning. We spent our Friday night date nights decorating his new office and every time someone moved a logo to a new side of the room, we went to see it. We were both over the moon and I'd never seen him so happy. 

At that point I'd made my life's mission to work in the music business. I had 6 music-related internships in college, I had a great music job after college that I'd had for 7 years and I couldn't get enough. I would do anything anyone asked me to do because I was so enamored with the industry. I just wanted to be a part of it and that was my dream. I knew that's what I was meant to do with my life.

After Jeff found happiness (and renewed creative energy) at his job, it started occurring to me that I wasn't completely fulfilled in my own job. The confusing part of it for me was, I loved a lot of things about my job. It was super flexible, I had more responsibility than a lot of people my age, the people I worked with had become family and most importantly, IT WAS MY DREAM. I also loved my clients and the thought of leaving made me so sad that any time it would enter my mind I'd think "BUT YOU'D MISS YOUR PEOPLE SO MUCH! You're so lucky! This is exactly what you wanted!"

Last June I stumbled upon Allison's article and I had the biggest light bulb moment of my entire life: I didn't love my dream anymore. Sure, I loved the people and I loved certain parts of it, but it really didn't fulfill me like it once had and it was no longer an overpowering driving "must do, have to have this" force in my life. It wasn't the job, it was the industry. Here's what I learned from Allison: It's totally OK to decide a dream you once had isn't for you anymore. It's OK to spend your whole life working towards something, get there, decide it's no longer for you and change course.

The day after I read this article I talked to Jeff about it and a week later I was at lunch with my boss, letting him know that I was starting to look for jobs and that I was ready to leave music.

It's stressful not knowing what comes next and let me say, I quit my dream before I had ANY clue what my next dream was or even what my next step was. That's a whole new level of "leap and the net will appear". 

While there was fear of what my next step would be, the personal freedom I gained by allowing myself to admit my change of heart has been liberating. I do miss my clients. I miss some of the people I got to work with every day but guess what? They're still in my life. As for music being exactly what I wanted, it was what I wanted...past tense. My dreams have evolved since I was 18 and I am perfectly, 100% A-OK with that.

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